23.10.2012

Alexandre Dumas - The Count of Monte Christo

File:Dumas by Nadar, 1855.jpg

Alexandre Dumas completed The Count of Monte Christo in 1844, collaborating with his  longtime ghostwriter Auguste Maquet. Alongside The Three Musketeers it's one of his most famous novels. Many writers call it a key influence during their youth: A book that can make people love to read. It's been the first, very pleasurable reading adventure on my Kindle (which is why I can't give pagenumbers). 

Here for you a very ramdom selection of quotations:

***
"Be happy, noble heart, be blessed for all the good thou hast done and wilt do hereafter, and let my gratitude remain in obscurity like your good deeds."

***
"Perhaps what I am about to say may seem strange to you, who are socialists, and vaunt humanity and your duty to your neighbor, but I never seek to protect a society which does not protect me, and which I will even say, generally occupies itself about me only to injure me; and thus by giving them a low place in my esteem, and preserving a neutrality towards them, it is society and my neighbor who are indebted to me."

***
Ordinarily M. de Villefort made and returned very few visits. His wife visited for him, and this was the received thing in the world, [...]—in fact, the application of the axiom, "Pretend to think well of yourself, and the world will think well of you," an axiom a hundred times more useful in society nowadays than that of the Greeks, "Know thyself," a knowledge for which, in our days, we have substituted the less difficult and more advantageous science of knowing others.

***

She seemed always so very eager to amuse herself, to have what people call a good time. To me it was as if she knew already then, that the overall picture of her life wasn't going to look like this, that in a future not too distant her life would consist of work and labour almost exclusively. 

***

"Very well," replied M. Danglars, who had listened to all this preamble with imperturbable coolness, but without understanding a word, since like every man burdened with thoughts of the past, he was occupied with seeking the thread of his own ideas in those of the speaker.

***

The past, like the country through which we walk, becomes indistinct as we advance. My position is like that of a person wounded in a dream; he feels the wound, though he cannot recollect when he received it. Come, then, thou regenerate man, thou extravagant prodigal, thou awakened sleeper, thou all-powerful visionary, thou invincible millionaire,—once again review thy past life of starvation and wretchedness, revisit the scenes where fate and misfortune conducted, and where despair received thee.

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